Skip to Navigation

Mental Health
Share This:

Second Opinion doctors often make the link between physical health and mental health. Patients on the show also discuss the importance of mental health, explaining how good mental health does more than help you enjoy life – it can make you feel better physically, do better at work, and handle life’s everyday issues and problems. Mental health is a factor in many diseases and conditions. Second Opinion doctors and patients have included mental health in their discussions of common problems such as heart diseases, and in some cases, devoted entire programs to specific mental health issues like depression and addiction. Click on the links below to learn more.

View Full Episodes:

Addiction
Watch on YouTube
Alzheimer's Disease: A Caregiver's Journey
Watch on YouTube
Anxiety Disorder
Watch on YouTube
Clinical Trials / Parkinson's Disease
Watch on YouTube
Depression Later In Life
Watch on YouTube
Female Sexual Dysfunction
Watch on YouTube
Forever Young
Watch on YouTube
Mind / Body Medicine
Watch on YouTube
Suicide
Watch on YouTube
Bipolar Disorder
Watch on YouTube
Breast Reconstruction
Watch on YouTube
Fecal Incontinence
Watch on YouTube
Spinal Cord Injury
Watch on YouTube
Grief
Watch on YouTube
Geriatric Oncology
Watch on YouTube
Conversion Disorder
Watch on YouTube
Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS)
Watch on YouTube
Teen Depression
Watch on YouTube

View Myth or Medicine:

Myth or Medicine: Teen Depression
See video

View Second Opinion 5:

See video
Second Opinion 5: Teen Depression

Featured Experts:

Barbara L. Andersen, Ph.D.
Barbara L. Andersen, Ph.D.
Gloria Baciewicz, M.D.
Jeffrey J. Bazarian, M.D., M.P.H.
Jeffrey J. Bazarian, M.D., M.P.H.
Judith S. Beck, Ph.D.
Karen Fasciano, PsyD
Karen Fasciano, PsyD
Susan McDaniel, PhD
Susan McDaniel, PhD
Elizabeth Murray DO, MBA, FAAP
Elizabeth Murray DO, MBA, FAAP
Michael A. Scharf, M.D.
Michael A. Scharf, M.D.
Donna Schuurman, EdD, FT
Donna Schuurman, EdD, FT
John Walkup, MD
John Walkup, MD

Teen Depression

(Source: Mayo Clinic) Teen depression is a serious medical problem that causes a persistent feeling of sadness and loss of interest in activities. It affects how your teen thinks, feels and behaves, and it can cause emotional, functional and physical problems. Although mood disorders, such as depression, can occur at any time in life, symptoms may be different between teens and adults.

Videos
Myth or Medicine: 
Myth or Medicine: Teen Depression
Second Opinion 5: 
Second Opinion 5: Teen Depression
Resources
Resource Description: 
Families for Depression Awareness is a nonprofit organization that helps families recognize and cope with depressive disorders to get people well and prevent suicides.
The Brain & Behavior Research Foundation is committed to alleviating the suffering caused by mental illness by awarding grants that will lead to advances and breakthroughs in scientific research.
The Balanced Mind Foundation guides families raising children with mood disorders to the answers, support and stability they seek.
Mayo Clinic is a nonprofit worldwide leader in medical care, research and education for people from all walks of life. Doctors from every medical specialty work together to care for patients, joined by common systems and a philosophy of "the needs of the patient come first."
Mental Health America is dedicated to promoting mental health, preventing mental and substance use conditions and achieving victory over mental illnesses and addictions through advocacy, education, research and service.
Medline Plus
Medline Description: 

Interactive Medical Search logoConduct an off-site search from MedlinePlus.  These up-to-date search results are based on search terms specific to Second Opinion Key Points.

Second Opinion Teen Depression Panel

Susan McDaniel, PhD

Director, Institute for the Family, Department of Psychiatry

Associate Chair, Department of Family Medicine

Susan McDaniel, PHD, a family psychologist on our faculty, is the Dr Laurie Sands Distinguished Professor of Families & Health in the Departments of Family Medicine and Psychiatry. She received a PhD in 1979 from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in clinical psychology, did her internship at the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, and was a fellow in family therapy at the Texas Research Institute for Mental Services in Houston.

Elizabeth Murray DO, MBA, FAAP

Pediatric Emergency Medicine

Dr.

Michael A. Scharf, M.D.

Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Pediatrics
Chief, Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
Director, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Fellowship
Department of Psychiatry
University of Rochester Medical Center

Dr. Scharf earned his undergraduate and Medical degrees at The State University of New York at Buffalo, and completed residency training in General Psychiatry and Child and Adolescent Psychiatry at the University of Rochester. 

He is currently the Chief of the Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Division and Director of the Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Fellowship at the University of Rochester Medical Center. 

Jeffrey J. Bazarian, M.D., M.P.H.

Assc Prof, Emergency Medicine, Neurology, and Neurosurgery at the Center for Neural Development and Disease, URMC

Dr. Bazarian is an emergency physician with a strong research interest in traumatic brain injury. He is associate professor of Emergency Medicine, Neurology, and Neurosurgery at the Center for Neural Development and Disease, University of Rochester Medical Center.

Mental Health

Second Opinion doctors often make the link between physical health and mental health. Patients on the show also discuss the importance of mental health, explaining how good mental health does more than help you enjoy life – it can make you feel better physically, do better at work, and handle life’s everyday issues and problems. Mental health is a factor in many diseases and conditions.

Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS)

(Source: NINDS / NIH) Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), sometimes called Lou Gehrig's disease, is a rapidly progressive, invariably fatal neurological disease that attacks the nerve cells (neurons) responsible for controlling voluntary muscles. The disease belongs to a group of disorders known as motor neuron diseases, which are characterized by the gradual degeneration and death of motor neurons.

Resources
Resource Description: 
There are a very large number of organizations and websites dedicated to ALS. This is only a partial list. The ALS Association: Established in 1985, The ALS Association is the only national non-profit organization fighting Lou Gehrig’s Disease on every front.
ALS Care: ALS CARE is committed to providing support to patients, their families, and caregivers by means of education and consultations.
National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS): The mission of the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke is to reduce the burden of neurological disease - a burden borne by every age group, by every segment of society, by people all over the world.
Medline Plus
Medline Description: 

Interactive Medical Search logoConduct an off-site search for ALS from MedlinePlus.  These up-to-date search results are based on search terms specific to Second Opinion Key Points.

Key Points: 

Key Point 1

Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, or ALS, is a progressive neurological disease (it just keeps getting worse).  Since there is no definitive test for ALS and the symptims can mimic many other medical conditions, the diagnosis of ALS can be difficult.  Getting a second opinion on the diagnosis of a serious disease like ALS can be critical.

Key Point 2

While there is not yet a cure for ALS, there are resources and technologies that can allow people with ALS to live their lives more fully.  Symptom management is a major ongoing component of the care of ALS and addressing symptoms as they change can minimize their effects on a person’s function, health, and quality of life

John Walkup, MD

Director, Division of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry
NY – Presbyterian Hospital
Weill Cornell Medical Center

John T. Walkup, MD is Professor of Psychiatry, DeWitt Wallace Senior Scholar, the Vice Chair of Psychiatry, and Director of the Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Weill Cornell Medical College and NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital. Prior to joining the faculty at Weill Cornell, Dr. Walkup spent 20 years at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine serving as Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and Deputy Director in the Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.

Conversion Disorder

(Source: PubMed Health / NIH) Conversion disorder is a condition in which a person has blindness, paralysis, or other nervous system (neurologic) symptoms that cannot be explained by medical evaluation. Symptoms can include blindness, paralysis and other physical symtpoms. Symptoms usually begin suddenly after a stressful experience. People are more at risk for a conversion disorder if they also have a medical illness, dissociative disorder, or a personality disorder.

Resources
Resource Description: 
Danielle's Journey: Watch a video of Second Opinion patient, Danielle Kerr and her journey with Conversion Disorder.
Mayo Clinic: Mayo Clinic is a nonprofit worldwide leader in medical care, research and education for people from all walks of life.
PubMed Health : PubMed Health specializes in reviews of clinical effectiveness research, with easy-to-read summaries for consumers as well as full technical reports.
Medline Plus
Medline Description: 

Interactive Medical Search logoConduct an off-site search for Conversion Disorder from MedlinePlus.  These up-to-date search results are based on search terms specific to Second Opinion Key Points.

Conversion Disorder (Mayo Clinic)

Conversion Disorder (MedlinePlus)

Key Points: 

Key Point 1

Sometimes neurological symptoms like blindness, paralysis and involuntary movements are caused not by a physiological problem but by a psychological upset of some kind.  Conversion Disorder is a condition where mental or emotional crisis produces stress that converts to a physical problem.  People diagnosed with conversion disorder are not “faking it”.  Their distress is very real and cannot be turned on and off at will.

Key Point 2

There is help for conversion disorder.  An effective treatment plan can include talk therapy, medication, relaxation techniques and sometimes the simple passage of time.  Whatever approach works for you, many people with conversion disorder benefit from a team approach to their recovery.

Geriatric Oncology

(Source: Cancer.net) More than 60% of cancers in the United States occur in people age 65 and older.  Cancers of the prostate, breast, colon, pancreas, bladder, stomach, lung, and rectum are the most common cancers in this age group.

Videos
Webisode: 
test web
Symptoms: 
Test symptom 1
Test Symptom 2
Resources
Resource Description: 
The mission of The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center is to eliminate cancer in Texas, the nation, and the world through outstanding programs that integrate patient care, research and prevention, and through education for undergraduate and graduate students, trainees, professionals, employees and the public.
The goal of SIOG is to foster the development of health professionals in the field of geriatric oncology, in order to optimize treatment of older adults with cancer.
The Wilmot Cancer Center is organized around a multidisciplinary care model, which leading cancer experts believe is the gold standard in cancer care in the 21st Century.
Medline Plus
Medline Description: 

Conduct an off-site search for Geriatric Oncology from MedlinePlus.  These up-to-date search results are based on search terms specific to Second Opinion Key Points.

Key Points: 

Key Point 1

When it comes to cancer, there is no “one size fits all” treatment for the older patient, and if your age is a consideration, it should be in terms of physiological, not chronological age.  The important thing to remember is that no matter what your age, you should know your options.

Key Point 2

Whether you are 65, 80 or 100, a host of factors – medical, practical and emotional – must be taken into account to devise a therapeutic plan.  No matter what plan of action you choose, a partnership with your health care team can help you better manage your care.

Syndicate content