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Resource Description: 
The American Sleep Apnea Association (ASAA) is a non-profit organization dedicated to reducing injury, disability, and death from sleep apnea and to enhancing the well-being of those affected by this common disorder.
The National Center on Sleep Disorders Research (NCSDR), site boasts a number of publications and fact sheets as well as a link to Star Sleeper, a site especially for and about kids.
The National Sleep Foundation is a nonprofit organization which researches sleep and sleep disorders.
The Strong Sleep Disorders Center (SSDC) was established in 2000 with a mission to excel in the clinical diagnosis and treatment of sleep disorders.
Episode number: 
1103
Transcript: 
Sleep Apnea (Transcript)

Symptoms that arise from sleep disorders may not immediately be recognized as being caused by sleep problems. Meet Carol Hage Wall who initially didn’t believe her struggles were related to sleep, but found relief and recovery from successful treatment.

(Source: NIH) Sleep apnea (AP-ne-ah) is a common disorder in which you have one or more pauses in breathing or shallow breaths while you sleep. Breathing pauses can last from a few seconds to minutes. They may occur 30 times or more an hour. Typically, normal breathing then starts again, sometimes with a loud snort or choking sound.

Sleep apnea usually is a chronic (ongoing) condition that disrupts your sleep. When your breathing pauses or becomes shallow, you’ll often move out of deep sleep and into light sleep. As a result, the quality of your sleep is poor, which makes you tired during the day. Sleep apnea is a leading cause of excessive daytime sleepiness.

Sleep Apnea Overview

Sleep apnea often goes undiagnosed. Doctors usually can't detect the condition during routine office visits. Also, no blood test can help diagnose the condition. Most people who have sleep apnea don't know they have it because it only occurs during sleep. A family member or bed partner might be the first to notice signs of sleep apnea.

The most common type of sleep apnea is obstructive sleep apnea. In this condition, the airway collapses or becomes blocked during sleep. This causes shallow breathing or breathing pauses.

When you try to breathe, any air that squeezes past the blockage can cause loud snoring. Obstructive sleep apnea is more common in people who are overweight, but it can affect anyone. For example, small children who have enlarged tonsil tissues in their throats may have obstructive sleep apnea.

Central sleep apnea is a less common type of sleep apnea. This disorder occurs if the area of your brain that controls your breathing doesn't send the correct signals to your breathing muscles. As a result, you'll make no effort to breathe for brief periods.

Central sleep apnea can affect anyone. However, it's more common in people who have certain medical conditions or use certain medicines.

Central sleep apnea can occur with obstructive sleep apnea or alone. Snoring typically doesn't happen with central sleep apnea.

This article mainly focuses on obstructive sleep apnea.

Complications of Sleep Apnea

Untreated sleep apnea can:

Sleep apnea is a chronic condition that requires long-term management. Lifestyle changes, mouthpieces, surgery, and breathing devices can successfully treat sleep apnea in many people.

Source: http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/health-topics/topics/sleepapnea/

Medline Plus

Medline Description: 

Conduct an off-site search for Sleep Disorders information from MedlinePlus.  These up-to-date search results are based on search terms specific to Second Opinion Key Points.

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