Skip to Navigation

Kidney Disease: Caring for a Chronic Illness (transcript)
Share This:

English Transcript

(Announcer) 
Major funding for Second Opinion is provided by the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association, an association if independent, locally owned, and community based Blue Cross Blue Shield Plans, committed to better knowledge for healthier lives. 


Additional funding provided by


(music).


(Dr. Peter Salgo) 
Welcome to Second Opinion, where each week we solve a medical mystery.  When we close this file in a half-an-hour from now, you'll not only know the outcome of this weeks case, you'll be better able to take charge of your own healthcare.  And doctors will be better able to listen to patients very effectively.  I'm your host, Dr. Peter Salgo, you already met our special guests, who are joining our primary care physician, Dr. Lou Papa.  Lou, welcome back again.

(Dr. Lou Papa) 
Thank you.

(Peter) 
No one on this team you see before me has ever seen the case, so we're going to get right to work.  Let me tell you a little bit about Carol and Jim.  Lou, Carol is 62 years old, she has diabetes and hypertension.  She's being treated for them.  Married to Jim for 40 years.  Jim works full time.  Now, Carol doesn't drive, so Jim takes time off from work to drive her around when she needs to go places.  All her appointments, helps with all of her medications, he's trying to do it all.  Carol is in her primary care doctor's office, and here's what she's complaining of: some loss of energy, some fatigue, she says she's not sleeping well, more frequent nighttime urination, she also says she has a hard time getting to sleep because she can't get her legs to relax.  And she also says she feels like she's retaining fluid, whatever that may mean.  What does that mean to you Lou?

(Lou) 
Some of those symptoms make me concerned about silent ischemia, that could lead to heart failure.

(Peter) 
Silent ischemia meaning ...

(Lou) 
Meaning you're having heart attacks, you're having damage done to your heart from small vessel disease, or even large vessel disease, over a period of time.

(Peter) 
But 'silent' meaning it doesn't cause any symptoms overtly.

(Lou) 
Doesn't cause any symptoms, right.

(Dr. Joseph Vassalotti)  
Silent, in this case, really means without pain.

(Lou) 
Without anything, so you, there's nothing. This just kind of came up out of nowhere.

(Peter) 
Ok so, heart is in your differential; what else is there?

(Dr. Lou Papa) 
Also, my differential is her kidneys.  Your kidneys also can be damaged by both hypertension and diabetes, that's a double whammy.

(Peter) 
Well I've got some immediate information, would you like some of this?

(Lou) 
Yes I would.

(Dr. Peter Salgo) 
The chart says that, her blood pressure, when measured in the doctors office that day, was 140 / 80.  It typically is about that.  She has some pitting edema; her glycosylated hemoglobin is approximately 7.  Her waist is greater than half her height, her weight is 81.5 kilos; what is that, about 180 pounds, give or take.  Her BMI is 29, and her cholesterol, thought she's on a statin, is 167, and she does not exercise consistently.  Her creatinine, a measure of her kidney function, 2.5.  And her glomerular filtration rate, which shall be referred to from this point forward as GFR, because it's easier for me to say, is 30.  Her hematocrit is 34, her calcium is 8.1, and there's some protein in her urine.  Trace.  What do you think?

(Lou) 
It's not good.  What it suggests is that her kidney function is basically a third of what it should be.  The protein in her urine is giving us a sign that there is damage, and she's spilling protein in her urine, where you should not be doing that.

(Peter) 
What do the kidneys do?

(Joe)  
The kidneys help clear the waste that build up in the body from metabolism of proteins, primarily, so the kidneys are filters that cleanse the body.  I think it's important for everyone to know that if you have diabetes, or you have high blood pressure, most people with kidney disease don't have these kind of symptoms, so it's very, very important to work with your primary care physician to get tested.  And the two tests you already mentioned, the GFR - that's kind of a level of how well the kidneys are functioning, and the urinary almubin creatinine ratio are some assessment of the urinary protein.  But to come back to this particular patient, she probably has chronic kidney disease.  It's usually , you need it three months or more, so we would assume that she's had this for three or more months.  She has severe decrease in kidney function, this would be stage 4 kidney disease, and really what she needs to know are the things that she may face, are dialysis and kidney transplantation.  That's usually when your GFR is less than about 15 - is about the range where that's considered.  And the other thing that's very important is that she's at very high risk for cardiovascular events.  Heart attacks, strokes, and unfortunately, premature cardiovascular death.

(Peter) 
You've been there, from the other side of the desk.  What was that like?

(Howard Moore)  
I'd like to start off by saying that this case that you mentioned is somewhat similar to my wife and I, and what we're going through, in that, I take her everywhere she goes.  She knows how to drive, and we recently moved here from New York, and she doesn't get around here that well by herself, so I do take her everywhere she goes.  And Dr. Papa was saying also, she has, like a double whammy, she had diabetes and the hypertension.  She had, we're doing the needles - what do you call that ... ?

(All) 
Insulin.

(Howard) 
Insulin, insulin, yeah, ok - she started with the insulin.  And I think, what it was, she was too far gone for the insulin to, you know, do what ... needed to be done.  I believe that's what it was, anyway.  So, you know, that brought on the kidney disease, the dialysis.

(Peter) 
So what do you want to do for Carol right now?

(Rebeca) 
One obvious thing was to make sure that she avoids certain medications that are bad for the kidneys.  There's very common medications - non-steroidal anti-inflammatory, drugs like ibuprofen, and all of those classes of medicines.  Acetaminophen, or Tylenol, is ok generally, if not too high in doses.  But a lot of those medicines can really reduce kidney function drastically.  That she hasn't been put on any new antibiotics recently that might be reducing her kidney function.  And, assuming that none of that has taken place, then we would make sure that she is on some medications that are protecting her kidneys, those, that class of blood pressure medicines, so ...

(Peter) 
An ACE inhibitor, what else?

(Joe) 
Well, she's also anemic ...

(Peter) 
He's trying to ...

(Dr. Rebeca Monk) 
alright ...

(Joe)  
...receptor blocker, an ACE inhibitor, these are similar kidney protecting medicines.

(Rebeca) 
Right, either one of those.

(Dr. Joseph Vassalotti)  
Those are blood pressure - types of blood pressure medicine.

(Suzanne Mintz) 
You're all talking, you know, medical-ease here, and I'm thinking of her and her husband sitting there, and saying, 'What the hell is going on?'  And ... (pause) ... and once you hear a diagnosis that sounds bad, you're not going to listen to anything else.  It's going to go out, and so, you've got to think about how this family is taking it in, and what you're going to be suggesting, aside from taking a bunch of pills, it sounds like to me, is lifestyle change.

(Howard) 
You know, she's right on point.  I think you do kind of blot it all out, because you go on to worst case scenario, you know, and you're thinking, like, ok this is it, you know ... so I think it's all how a doctor tells you whatever without - he definitely has to use some medical, you know, terms, but you know, come right down home, you know, where I can understand exactly what you're saying, and sort of ease my feelings or concerns.

(Joe) 
We just said, that all that litany of medicines we just went through, and all the complications, and the evaluation - that's probably not one visit, that's going to be probably multiple visits.

(Rebeca) 
That's what I was thinking, yeah.

(Dr. Peter Salgo) 
I can tell you what the chart says here, Lou.  She was put on insulin, the injections, as well as a pill, Metformin.  And Jim sat there, taking notes to make sure that he had all of the instructions written down, and he was terrified that she was going to wind up on dialysis anyway.  This word keeps bubbling to the surface.  He's scared of losing his wife, and he's scared of losing his job.  If she goes on dialysis, and needs him at home - just for the record, dialysis is the artificial kidney ...

(Lou) 
It's the artificial kidney machine, right.

(Peter) 
Howard, are Jim's fears justified?

(Howard) 
Oh, sure.  Sure, without a doubt.  In my case, I didn't necessarily have to worry about losing my job, because I was retired at the time, but I thought I was going to lose my wife.  Right now it's like, 43 years, so just dealing with that fear - it was really terrifying.  I think our faith is what carried us through.

(Peter) 
You're sitting there. 

(Howard Moore) 
Yes.

(Peter) 
All this, I'm sure, is flashing through your mind, it's amazing how fast things zoom through your mind when you hear these words.  You, all of you on this panel, have seen, over the course of time, what this means to a patient and a family.  What do they have to look forward to?

(Gail Gibson Hunt) 
Well I think the thing that we haven't touched on at all is how Jim is really feeling.  We've talked a lot about his wife, about Carol, but not so much what - if he loses his job, what's that going to mean for the family, in terms of their income, and he has to be totally freaked out about that.  Plus, if she does go on dialysis, isn't he going to be the one driving her three times a week, waiting for her, driving her back, and what toll is this going to take on his health?  On their financial - the whole financial for their family ...what this can mean for him.  Maybe he could juggle his job for a while, but maybe not for a long time - but that's ... we have to be sure to keep his issues in mind as well as hers.

(Suzanne) 
Once you hear a diagnosis that, although nobody's saying it, could, you know, end her life sooner than it normally would, it is like an atom bomb, you know, that goes off on your head.  And it takes a long time to adjust to the situations, to even realize what is going to be happening.  And, as the caregiver, Jim is not thinking about himself right away.  He's thinking about Carol, and what is it he can do to help Carol.  And it might take a long time for him to realize the toll that all of this is taking on him, because studies have shown that the stress that family caregivers are under has a great effect on them emotionally.  The depression rate among family caregivers is very high, and among spouses it's six times as high as the regular population.  Impacted immune system - Jim is more likely to get a chronic disease of his own.  You even age prematurely, because of all the stress.  But that's not going to come into his head; it's going to be all about Carol.

(Peter) 
I'll tell you whose head it also is not in, if you can believe this chart - it's not in the head of any of the doctors writing in here.
 
(Suzanne) 
No.

(Peter) 
They're all talking about Carol; nobody is talking about Jim.  Does that surprise you?

(Suzanne Mintz) 
No.

(Dr. Peter Salgo) 
Let me flash-forward in the chart here, if I may.  She does everything she's told to do.  Jim does everything they've asked him to do to help her.  However, over the intervening three years, she had complications.  She had a foot infection, she had congestive heart failure once - it's not detailed whether she had a heart attack or not.  And now she's progressed to, what's called in the chart, frank renal failure, and she's put on dialysis.  So what everyone feared three years previously has come to pass.  Howard, you were there.  Your wife eventually needed dialysis - what's that like, for you, and for her, as a team?

(Howard) 
She strengthened me, you know?  With her fortitude, and being able to go through this without the complaints that I think, you know, I may have had.  She was on dialysis maybe, three years.  And right after that, I had a stroke, I had a brain tumor, and she was coming home from dialysis, taking care of me.  It was a struggle, in the beginning, just dealing with this, but I can truly say that, without someone like her, I don't know how I would have been able to, you know, deal with it.

(Peter) 
There you were taking care of a wife with a chronic disease, needing dialysis, and suddenly, you fell ill.

(Howard) 
Sure.

(Peter) 
Does this story confirm, in your mind, what you were saying about the caregiver being at great risk?

(Gail) 
Of course, that's the ... that's exactly the kind of story that we were talking about.  And especially because initially, and for a certain time, you were, I'm sure focused on her.  It was about, gosh, you know,  my wife is really sick, I need to help her, I need to support her.  And you didn't really focus, maybe, on your own health.  Maybe you didn't get the checkups that you needed, and, who knows, if, you know, I mean, not that that's a blame thing, it's just that feeling that if you're the family caregiver, I'm focused on this other person, and keeping them healthy.  And I don't think about my own health, maybe, as I should.  And that's been documented over and over again, that that happens.

(Peter) 
Well let me tell you a little bit more about Carol and Jim.  Carol does go on dialysis, they begin regular dialysis visits three times a week.  The visits are four hours each, on the machine, plus prep time.  And transportation - the center's 18 miles from their home, so Jim leaves work to take her there, leaves work again, I interpret this, to pick her up.  He wants to stay with her, but he's used up most of his personal time taking her to appointments.  Friends help, but they've got their lives too.  So what is Jim's life like right now?

(Suzanne) 
It ain't good ... because, he's trying to balance everything.  His responsibilities at work as well as the care he's giving Carol, so it just ups the ante on his own stress.  And ... you did mention friends, and I think that's important.  I mean, family caregivers tend not to ask for help.  But more and more, people are beginning to realize that they need a team.

(Peter) 
Outpatient dialysis goes on like this, with her husband driving Carol back and forth to the dialysis center for two years.  Then things take a turn for the worse.  Carol suffers a stroke.  And it results in paralysis of her left arm and left leg, and with this disability and her weight, it's no longer possible for Jim to get her to dialysis.  He can't physically move her.  She can't help him do it.  Neither Jim nor Carol want her to go to a nursing home.  So they opt for peritoneal dialysis.

(Joe) 
The point of this is, they were forced into a situation where they had to make a dialysis modality change, a treatment change.  That treatment change could have been made two years before, if it suited their lifestyle better.  So there's no ... you know, every time there's a complication, you can reevaluate the dialysis treatment.

(Peter) 
What is peritoneal dialysis?

(Joe) 
So peritoneal dialysis - where you can have a tube, or a catheter that goes into your abdomen.  You have fluid that's exchanged in and out of your abdomen.  Usually it's four times a day, it's called the CAPD.  Or it can be done at night with something called the cycler machine that cycles the fluid in and out.

(Dr. Peter Salgo) 
You can do this at home.  So Jim needs to be trained to do this, right?

(Dr. Joseph Vassalotti) 
Yes. 

(Peter) 
Which training he gets ...

(Joe) 
Unfortunately it sounds like, if his wife has this ... is paralyzed on one side, she probably can't contribute that much to the training, unfortunately.

(Suzanne) 
Fine, he's going to be trained to use this machine, but he's going to be scared out of his mind, and wonder about, what the heck's going to happen.  And he's pretty much on his own, and the level of training that people often get is just minimal.  I think there's a line between, what is the role of a very conscientious family caregiver, and what is the role of medicine.

(Peter) 
Let's pause for just a minute and sum up; we've covered a lot of ground.  In management of a chronic disease, the burden on the caregiver is great, and there are physical and emotional costs to the caregiver, not just to the patient.  The patient is not the only one who needs to be watched, and not the only one who needs to be taken care of.  Is that a fair statement?

(Howard) 
Sure, sure.

(Peter)
Does it sound like we're taking care of the caregiver here at all, based on what you've heard so far?

(Gail) 
No.  And it doesn't sound like he recognizes - and this is very typical - he doesn't recognize that he is a family caregiver.  So he doesn't identify himself.

(Peter) 
Well let me tell you what happens over the next several years.  Carol has five separate peritoneal dialysis catheters replaced due to infections.  She had peritonitis - infection of her abdomen.  She suffers two heart attacks, she is bed bound.  The last attempted peritoneal dialysis failed again.  Now what?  What happens now, medically?  What do you have to offer?

(Rebeca) 
Well I think this is where we hope that the physicians and Jim and Carol have had discussions about how far Carol would want to go, and if her quality of life is still to the point where she wants to continue dialysis.

(Peter) 
Well I can tell you that Carol is aware of the gravity of the situation.  And she sees that her care is wearing Jim down, and she tells her doctor she is considering two options ... she can go into a nursing home, but she explicitly says that would deplete their savings and retirement fund, and she says here, 'I know I'm going to die before Jim, this will leave him bankrupt.'  She says she also knows she could simply stop dialysis, as you point out, and go into an end of life care, such as a hospice.  She says at least this will leave Jim with memories, and able to live above the poverty level.  Wouldn't her insurance cover a nursing home?  Why does she have to bankrupt herself?

(laughter)

(Lou) 
Well, that's ... that's a mini-series!

(Suzanne)  
You got that right!  People believe that Medicare covers long term care.  Which, it's not only nursing homes, but nursing homes are part of one option in long term care.  But in fact, it does not.

(Dr. Peter Salgo) 
But isn't this an amazing paradox?  Our technology ...everything that we've brought to bear has helped Carol extend her life, and yet, here we are at the end of the day, having to make a wrenching decision, which we wouldn't have had to make without this technology.  How on earth do you make that decision?

(Dr. Lou Papa) 
Because -- because the medical system is built on a bang, not a whimper ... philosophy. 

(Peter) 
T.S. Elliott now bring us into the real world ...

(Lou) 
Right, right, so basically our medical system's built on an acute care model ... 

(Suzanne Mintz) 
Yes, yes ...

(Lou) 
... you break your leg, you get a cut, you get a cold, you go to the doctor, you get treated, episodic.  It's not built on a chronic care model.  Most people don't die in bed, you know?  They got to bed, and the grandkids ... They get chronically ill, and there's a prolonged - most of the healthcare dollars are spent in the last year of life.  So that, the medical system as a whole - and this is part of my frustration, if you can't tell - is built on ....

(Suzanne) 
Mine too!

(Lou) 
... right, it's built on this acute care model that is antiquated.  It's the equivalent of like, you know ...

(Peter) 
Well here we are, I mean, that ... all that notwithstanding ... here we are at the end of the day ... how does anybody address, engage this decision?  I think I'm going to let myself expire, so that my husband's memories of me are happy, and he has money to live long.  How has our technology, at the end of the day, brought us to this question, which - in days past, used to be ...

(Peter) 
... reserved to the Almighty.  Who makes these decisions?  I mean, do you, as a doctor, do you weigh in on these things, or is this not a medical decision?

(Dr. Rebeca Monk) 
We do weigh in, we speak ...  refer dialysis patients, we get together with the patients regularly, several times a year, to discuss what their wishes would be, and ... we hope that when they decide to withdraw dialysis, if it is because of ... lack of quality of life, that it is their decision to do so.

(Lou) 
The conversations that have to happen, and they're not 15 minutes ... they can't be done over the phone, they really require multiple family members, multiple caregivers that may not even be family members - to discuss this.  So, yeah, I mean, it's ... it is part of taking care of the patient.

(Joe) 
I think the concept here ... you know, we've tried far to maintain life, to prolong life ... and we haven't really spent much time thinking about a good death.  I think we're all going to die ... these are issues we're all going to have to face, and these are issues that are really just starting to come to the fray.  And also there's a whole field of medicine now -palliative care medicine - that really, I think, has gone a long way to addressing, you know, just the issues of making the patient feel better, making the patient feel comfortable, and making the family feel comfortable with the transition.

(Peter) 
Howard, how is your wife doing now?

(Howard Moore) 
She's doing great ... again, I just repeat myself about how strong she, you know, appears ... that's her faith - our faith - that at some point she won't have to go through this, that there is a kidney there for her.  And, that's what she believes and I believe ... will happen.

(Peter) 
Let's pause for just a minute and sum up; we've covered a lot of ground.  When dealing with end-stage chronic disease, the decisions for and against intervention can be agonizing to make and to live with.  It is important that open communication results in all options getting weighed.  Carol and Jim weighed their options.  As disabled as Carol is, she and Jim decided to sell off all of their property to pay for her care at a local nursing home where she can get dialysis, and she went into the nursing home.  Then, together, they wrote an advanced directive, where Carol stipulated that if she lost cognitive function, if she could not interact with Jim, she wanted to be taken off dialysis, and that no extraordinary care be given, if her heart fails, that is, she made herself 'do not resuscitate' ... DNR.  Howard ... you're not there.  What advice, as someone who's a caregiver for someone else with kidney disease, what advice could you offer?

(Howard) 
I think that this is something that should be put on the table by anyone, because we know it's inevitable.

(Dr. Lou Papa) 
Absolutely.

(Dr. Peter Salgo) 
What do you make of Carol's decision?  And especially selling off all the property, going into a nursing home?

(Gail Gibson Hunt) 
I started thinking right away about, isn't there something else that they could be doing, other than selling off all their property?  Because it just seems to me, what's going to happen to Jim, in the end?  I mean, that's very common, that the living, the surviving spouse is left with no money.  I mean, what's he going to do?

(Peter) 
One last question, very briefly - who has the harder journey here, Carol or her caregiver husband?

(Suzanne) 
Wow ...

(Lou)  
Yes ... yes ...

(Suzanne) 
I don't ... I don't think you could answer that.  And, quite frankly, they depend on the individual family ... but they both ... really really hard.
(Peter) Well, with that, we have run out of time.  I want to thank all of you for being here.  Howard - sharing this kind of information is never easy.  Thank you so much for coming, we really appreciate it.

(Howard) 
Thank you for having me.

(Peter) 
With that, let me sum up a few things, because we covered a lot of ground today.  There're some key things to remember.  In management of a chronic disease, the burden on the caregiver is great, and there are physical and emotional costs to the caregiver.  The patient is not the only one who needs to be watched and taken care of.  When dealing with end-stage chronic disease, the decisions for and against intervention can be agonizing to make and to live with.  It is important that open communication results in all options getting weighed.  And of course, our final message is always this: taking charge of your health means being informed, having quality communication with your doctor.  I'm Dr. Peter Salgo, and I'll see you next time for another Second Opinion.


(Announcer) 
Search for health information and learn more about doctor/patient communication on the Second Opinion website. The address is pbs.org. 

(music)


(Announcer) 
Major funding for Second Opinion is provided by the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association.  An association of independent, locally owned, and community based Blue Cross Blue Shield plans committed to better knowledge for healthier lives. 

Additional funding by:

 

 (music)

We are PBS.

 

Spanish Transcript

(Locutor) 
Los fondos principales para Second Opinion son ofrecidos por la Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association, una asociación de planes de la Blue Cross/Blue Shield que son independientes, de propiedad local y basados en la comunidad, dedicados a un mejor conocimiento para tener vidas saludables.  

Fondos Adicionales ofrecidos por:

{música de fondo}

 

(Dr. Peter Salgo) 
Bienvenidos a Second Opinion, donde cada semana, nuestro equipo de cuidado de salud resuelve un misterio médico.  Cuando cerremos este archivo de aquí a media hora, no sólo sabrán el resultado del caso de esta semana, sino que podrán hacerse cargo de su propio cuidado de salud y los doctores podrán escuchar a sus pacientes eficazmente. Yo soy su anfitrión,  Dr. Peter Salgo, y ya han conocido a nuestros invitados especiales quiénes se unen a nuestro doctor de cuidado primario, Dr. Lou Papa.  Lou, bienvenido de nuevo.

(Dr. Lou Papa) 
Gracias.

(Peter) 
Nadie aquí en el grupo conoce este caso, y vayamos de lleno a trabajar. Permítanme contarles un poco de Carol y Jim.  Lou, Carol tiene 62 años de edad, tiene diabetes e hipertensión.  Ella ha sido tratada por éso. Casada con Jim por 40 años.  Jim trabaja de tiempo completo.  Ahora, Carol no maneja, así es que Jim saca tiempo del trabajo para llevarla cuando ella necesita ir a sitios.  Todas las citas de ella, ayuda con todos los medicamentos, él trata de hacerlo todo. Carol está en la oficina de su doctor de cuidado primario y de ésto ella se queja:  alguna falta de energía, algún cansancio, ella dice que no duerme bien, tiene que orinar más frecuentemente durante la noche, ella también dice que tiene mucha dificultad en dormir porque no puede hacer que sus piernas se relajen.   Y también ella dice que se siente que está reteniendo líquido, lo que eso quiera decir.    ¿Qué significa esto para tí, Lou?

(Lou) 
Algunos de esos síntomas me preocupan que pueda ser isquemia silenciosa, que podría resultar en un paro cardiaco.

(Peter) 
Isquemia silenciosa que significa........

(Lou) 
Quiere decir que estás teniendo ataques del corazón, estás haciéndole daño al corazón  por la enfermedad de los canales pequeños, o aún de la enfermedad de los canales grandes, por un periodo de tiempo.

(Peter) 
Pero ‘silenciosa' quiere decir que no demuestra síntomas abiertamente.

(Lou) 
No causa ningun síntoma, correcto. .

(Dr. Joseph Vassalotti)  
Silenciosa, en este caso, realmente quiere decir sin dolor.

(Lou) 
Sin nada, así es que tú, no hay nada.  Ésto surgió de la nada.

(Peter) 
Bueno, así es que el corazón está en tu diferencial; ¿qué más hay?

(Dr. Lou Papa) 
También, mi diferencial tiene sus riñones. Tus riñones también pueden ser dañados por ambas la hipertensión y la diabetes. Éso es mala suerte.

(Peter) 
Bueno, yo tengo alguna información de inmediato. ¿Desean  algo de ésto? 

(Lou) 
Si, me gustaría.

(Dr. Peter Salgo) 
El cuadro dice que, su presión arterial, cuando fue medida en la oficina del doctor ese día,  fue 140 / 80.  Es típicamente como éso.   Ella tiene una edema profunda, su hemoglobina glucosilada  es aproximadamente 7.  Su cintura es mas grande que la mitad de su estatura, su peso es 81.5 kilos; que mas o menos es como 180 libras.  Su BMI es 29, y su colesterol, creí que estaba en una estatin, es 167, y ella no hace ejercicios consistentemente.   Su creatinina, una medida de su función renal, 2.5.  Y su tabla de filtración glomerular, que será referida de aquí en adelante como GFR, porque es mucho más fácil para mi decirlo, es 30.  Su hematocrito es 34, su calcio es 8.1, y hay algo de proteína en su orina.  Trazalo.  ¿Qué creen?

(Lou) 
No es bueno. Lo que sugiere es que su función renal es básicamente un tercio de lo que debería ser. La proteína en su orina nos da una señal de que hay daño, y ella esta botando proteína en su orina donde no debería estar sucediendo. .

(Peter) 
¿Qué hacen los riñones?

(Joe)  
Los riñones ayudan a botar el desperdicio que se acumula en el cuerpo por el metabolismo de proteínas, principalmente, así es que los riñones son filtros que limpian el cuerpo. Yo creo que es importante que todos sepan que si tienen diabetes, o tienen la presión alta, la mayoría de las personas con enfermedad de los riñones no tienen esta clase de síntomas, es muy, muy importante que se trabaje con el médico de cuidado primario para ser examinado. Y los dos exámenes que ya has mencionado, el GFR – ése es como un nivel de cuán bien están los riñones funcionando, y la taza de creatinina almubina urinaria son algunas de las evaluaciones de la proteína urinaria.  Pero, regresando a este paciente en particular, ella probablemente tiene enfermedad crónica de los riñones. Casi siempre, lo necesitas tres meses o más, así es que podemos asumir que ella lo ha tenido por tres meses o más. Ella tiene una reducción severa en la función renal. Ésto sería como la etapa 4 de una enfermedad de los riñones, y realmente lo que ella necesita saber son las cosas a las que se enfrentará, que son diálisis y transplante del riñón.  Éso es cuando tu GFR es menos de 15 – es más o menos la tabla cuando éso se considera.  Y la otra cosa que es muy importante es que ella tiene un alto riesgo para eventos  cardiovasculares.  Ataques cardiacos, derrames, y desafortunadamente, muerte cardiovascular prematura.

(Peter) 
Tu has estado ahí, del otro lado del escritorio. ¿Cómo fue éso?

(Howard Moore)  
Yo quisiera comenzar diciendo que este caso que tu mencionastes es algo parecido a mi esposa y a mí, y por lo que estamos pasando, en que, yo la llevo a todos los sitios que ella va.  Ella sabe conducir, y recientemente nos mudamos aquí de New York, y ella no se mueve por acá muy bien por su cuenta, así es que yo la llevo a todos los lugares.  Y Dr. Papa decía también, que ella tiene mala suerte doble, ella tiene diabetes y la hipertensión.  Ella tuvo...estamos haciendo las agujas, - ¿cómo se llama ♪0so...? 

(Todos) 
Insulina.

(Howard) 
Insulina, insulina, si, ok – ella comenzó con insulina. Y yo creo, que lo que fue, ella estaba peor para que la insulina, ustedes saben,  hiciera lo que tenía que hacer.  Yo creo que éso fue lo que pasó, de todas maneras.  Así es, ya saben, éso trajo la enfermedad renal, la diálisis. 

(Peter) 
¿Entonces, qué quieres hacer por Carol ahora?

(Rebeca) 
Una cosa obvia era asegurarse que ella evitara ciertos medicamentos que eran malos para los riñones.  Hay medicamentos muy comunes – drogas anti-imflamatorias, non-esteroides, drogas como ibuprofen, y todas esas clases de medicinas. La.  Acetaminophen, o Tylenol, están bien generalmente, si no son muy altos en la dosis. Pero muchas de esas medicinas pueden reducir drásticamente la función renal. Que a ella no la hayan puesto en algunos antibióticos nuevos recientemente que podrían reducir su funcion de los riñones. Y, asumiendo que nada de éso ha sucedido, entonces nos aseguraríamos de que ella esté bajo algunos medicamentos que estén protegiendo sus riñones, aquéllos, esa clase de medicinas para la presión arterial, así es que .....

(Peter) 
¿Un inhibidor ACE, qué más?

(Joe) 
Bueno, ella es anémica también .......

(Peter) 
Él esta tratando de ....

(Dr. Rebeca Monk) 
está bien ........

(Joe)  
...un bloqueador receptor, un inhibidor ACE, éstas son medicinas similares de protección de riñones.

(Rebeca) 
Correcto, cualquiera de ellas.

(Dr. Joseph Vassalotti)  
Ésos son tipos para la presión arterial – clases de medicina para la presión arterial.

(Suzanne Mintz) 
Ustedes todos están hablando, ya saben, lenguaje médico aquí, y yo estoy pensando de ella y su esposo sentados allá, y diciendo, ‘¿Qué diablos está pasando?'  Y ...(pausa)   y una vez se escucha un diagnóstico que suena mal, no van a escuchar nada más. Éso va a salir afuera, y desde luego, tienen que pensar acerca de cómo esta familia lo está tomando, y que es lo que van a sugerir, además de tomar una cantidad de píldoras, me parece a mí, que es un cambio del estilo de vida.

(Howard) 
Ustedes saber, que ella está en lo correcto.  Yo creo que tú tratas de taparlo todo, porque pasas a un pronóstico peor,  ustedes saben, y tú piensas como, está bien ésto es, así es que, yo pienso que todo es como el doctor te dice lo que sea, sin – él definitivamente tiene que usar algunos términos médicos, pero ustedes saben, todo surge en la casa, como saben, donde yo pueda entender exactamente lo que dicen y tratar de facilitarme mis emociones y preocupaciones.

(Joe) 
Nosotros dijimos, que toda esa letanía de medicinas que acabamos de mencionar, y todas las complicaciones, y la evaluación – éso no es probablemente una visita, sino que probablemente serán muchas visitas.

(Rebeca) 
Eso era lo que yo estaba pensando, oh sí.

(Dr. Peter Salgo) 
Yo te puedo decir lo que el cuadro dice aquí, Lou.  A ella la pusieron en insulina, las inyecciones, además de una pildora, Metformin.  Y Jim sentado allí, tomando notas, para asegurarse que tenía todas las instrucciones escritas, y él estaba atemorizado que ella iba a terminar en diálisis de todas maneras. Esta palabra sigue saliendo a la superficie. El tiene miedo de perder a su esposa, y tiene miedo de perder su trabajo. Si ella va a diálisis, y lo necesita a él en la casa – para el record, diálisis es el riñón artificial....

(Lou) 
Es la maquina del riñón artificial, correcto. .

(Peter) 
Howard, ¿son los miedos de Jim justificados?

(Howard) 
Oh, seguro.  Seguro, sin duda. En mi caso, yo no necesariamente tuve que preocuparme de perder mi empleo, porque yo estaba jubilado en ese tiempo, pero, yo pensaba que iba a perder a mi esposa.  Ahora son como, 43 años, así es que bregando con ese miedo, era un terror.  Yo creo que nuestra fé fué lo que nos ayudó.

(Peter) 
Tu estas sentado allí.  

(Howard Moore) 
Sí.

(Peter) 
Todo ésto, estoy seguro, está pasando por tu mente, es increíble, cuán rápido las cosas pasan por tu mente cuando escuchas estas palabras.  Ustedes, todos ustedes en este panel, han visto, a través del tiempo, que significa ésto para un paciente y la familia.  ¿Qué tienen que considerar en el futuro?

(Gail Gibson Hunt) 
Bueno, yo creo que la cosa que no hemos tocado en lo absoluto es como Jim se siente realmente.  Hemos hablado mucho acerca de su esposa,  de Carol, pero no mucho si él pierde el trabajo, que significa ésto para la familia, en términos de su ingreso, y él tiene que estar totalmente atemorizado sobre éso. ¿Además, si ella va a diálisis, no es él que la va a llevar tres veces por semana, esperando por ella, regresándola, y que clase de efecto va a causar en su salud?  En lo económico – todo lo financiero para su familia...que puede significar para él. Quizás el puede arreglárselas con su trabajo por un tiempo, pero no por mucho tiempo – pero éso es ... tenemos que tener en mente sus asuntos lo mismo que los de ella.

(Suzanne) 
Una vez se escucha un diagnóstico que, aunque nadie lo está diciendo, podría, ya saben, terminar su vida antes de lo normal, es como una bomba atómica, que como saben, podría explotar en tu cabeza.  Y toma mucho tiempo adaptarse a las situaciones, y aún darse cuenta de lo va a estar ocurriendo.  Y, como el responsable de su cuidado, Jim no está pensando en sí mismo ensequida. El está pensando en Carol, y que es lo que él puede hacer para ayudar a Carol.  Y pueda que tome mucho tiempo para él darse cuenta del efecto que esto está causando en él, porque los estudios han demostrado que el estrés que tienen los que cuidan a la familia, tiene un efecto grande en ellos emocionalmente. La proporción de depresión entre los que cuidan a la familia es muy alta, y entre los cónyugues es seis veces más alto que la población regular. El sistema de inmunización impactado -  Jim  está más propenso a adquirir una enfermedad crónica por síi mismo.   Hasta envejeces prematuramente, por todo el estrés. Pero eso no entrará en su cabeza, todo será acerca de Carol.

(Peter) 
Yo les digo en que cabeza no está tampoco, si pueden creer este cuadro – no está en la cabeza de ninguno de los doctores escribiendo aquí.  
 
(Suzanne) 
No.

(Peter) 
Ellos todos hablan de Carol; nadie está hablando de Jim. ¿Ésto les sorprende?

(Suzanne Mintz) 
No.

(Dr. Peter Salgo) 
Permítanme ir hacia delante en el cuadro aquí.  Ella hace todo lo que le dicen que haga.   Jim hace todo lo que ellos le han pedido que haga para ayudarla. Sin embargo, dentro de los tres años de intervención, ella tuvo complicaciones. Ella tuvo una infección del pie, ella tuvo un paro cardiaco una vez – no está detallado si tuvo un ataque del corazón o no. Y ahora ha progresado, a lo que se indica en el cuadro, un fallo renal, y la han puesto en diálisis. Así es que, lo que todos temían hace tres años previamente, ha venido a pasar.   Howard, tú estuviste ahí. Tu esposa necesitó eventualmente la diálisis. ¿Cómo fue eso, para tí, y para ella, como en equipo?

(Howard) 
Ella me dió fuerzas, ¿saben?   Con su valor, y pudiendo pasar todo ésto sin las quejas que yo creo, ustedes sabrán, que yo pude haber tenido. Ella estuvo en diálisis, quizás, tres años. Y despues de éso, yo tuve un derrame.  Yo tuve un tumor en el cerebro, y ella venía de diálisis, a cuidarme.  Fue una lucha, en el comienzo, sólo tratando con ésto, pero de verdad puedo decir que, sin alguien como ella, yo no se como hubiese podido, ya saben, bregar con ésto.

(Peter) 
Ahí tu estabas cuidando una esposa con una enfermedad crónica, necesitando diálisis, y tú, de repente, caístes enfermo.

(Howard) 
Claro.

(Peter) 
¿Confirma esta historia, en sus mentes, lo que estaban diciendo acerca del gran riesgo que tienen los que cuidan?

(Gail) 
Por supuesto....ésa es..  ésa es la clase de historia de la que hablábamos.  Y especialmente debido a  que inicialmente, por un periodo de tiempo, estoy seguro, que tú estabas enfocado en ella.   Era como, tu sabes, mi esposa está muy enferma, necesito ayudarla, necesito darle apoyo.  Y tú no te enfocastes, y, quien sabe, si, tú sabes, quiero decir,  no que sea una cosa de culpabilidad, es solo un sentimiento de que si tú eres el responsable del cuidado de la familia, yo estoy enfocado en esta otra persona, y manteniéndola saludable.  Y no pienso en mi propia salud, quizás, como debería.  Y éso ha sido documentado una y otra vez, que éso sucede.

(Peter) 
Bueno, les voy a decir un poco más de Carol y Jim.  Carol entra en diálisis, ellos comienzan visitas regulares de diálisis tres veces por semana.  Las visitas son de cuatro horas cada una, en la máquina, más el tiempo de preparación. Y la transportación – el centro queda a 18 millas de su casa, asíi es que Jim sale del trabajo para llevarla allá, sale del trabajo de nuevo, yo interpreto ésto, como para ir a recogerla.  El quiere permanecer con ella, pero él ha usado casi todo el tiempo personal llevándola a sus citas. Los amigos ayudan pero tienen sus vidas también. ¿Así es que, cómo es la vida de Jim ahora mismo? 

(Suzanne) 
No es buena... porque él está tratando de balancear todo. Sus responsabilidades en el trabajo, como también el cuidado que le está dando a Carol, asíi es que le aumenta su propio estrés.  Y...tu mencionastes amigos, y yo creo que éso es importante.  Quiero decir, los que cuidan a la familia tienden  a no pedir ayuda. Pero, más y más, la gente está comenzando a darse cuenta que necesita un equipo.


(Peter) 
La diálisis ambulatoria continúa así, con su esposo llevando a Carol de aquí para allá al centro de diálisis por dos años.  Entonces, las cosas se ponen peor.  Carol sufre un derrame.  Y resulta en parálisis del brazo izquierdo y la pierna izquierda y con esta incapacidad y su peso, ya no es posible que Jim la lleve a diálisis. Él físicamente no puede moverla. Ella no lo puede ayudar a hacerlo. Ni Jim ni Carol quieren que ella vaya a un asilo. Entonces, deciden por una diálisis peritoneal.

(Joe) 
El punto de ésto es, que ellos se vieron forzados a una situación donde tuvieron que hacer un cambio de modalidad de la diálisis, un cambio en el tratamiento.  Ese cambio de  tratamiento pudo haberse llevado a cabo dos años antes, si hacia el modo de vida de ellos mucho mejor. Así es que no... como saben,  cada vez que hay una complicación, pueden reevaluar el tratamiento de la diálisis.  

(Peter) 
¿Qué es la diálisis peritoneal?

(Joe) 
La diálisis peritoneal – donde puedes tener un tubo, o un catéter que va dentro del abdomen.  Tienes líquidos que se intercambian dentro y fuera del abdomen.  Usualmente, es cuatro veces al día, se llama el CAPD.  O se puede hacer de noche con algo llamado la máquina cíclica que en ciclos el líquido entra y sale.

(Dr. Peter Salgo) 
Puedes hacer ésto en la casa. Así es que Jim necesita ser entrenado para hacerlo. ¿Correcto?

(Dr. Joseph Vassalotti) 
Sí. 

(Peter) 
Cual entrenamiento reciba él...

(Joe) 
Desafortunadamente, ésto suena como, si su esposa tiene ésto... está paralizada de un lado,  probablamente ella no puede contribuir mucho al entrenamiento, desafortunadamente.

(Suzanne) 
Bien, él va a ser entrenado para usar esta máquina, pero el va a estar muy atemorizado y se preguntará, que será lo que sucederá. . Y él esta más o menos por su cuenta, y el nivel de entrenamiento que la gente recibe casi siempre es el mínimo.  Yo creo que hay una línea entre, cuál es el rol de una persona responsable que cuida a un familiar, y cuál es el rol de la medicina.

(Peter) 
Tomemos una pausa por un minuto y repasemos. Hemos cubierto mucho terreno. En el manejo de una enfermedad crónica, el peso en la persona que cuida es grande, y hay gastos físicos y emocionales al que cuida, no solamente al paciente. El paciente no es el único que necesita ser observado, y no es el único que necesita ser cuidado. ¿Es una declaración justa?

(Howard) 
Claro, claro..

(Peter)
¿Suena como que estamos cuidando a la persona que cuida aquí, basado en lo que han escuchado hasta ahora?

(Gail) 
No.  Y no parece que él reconoce – y ésto es bien típico – él no reconoce que él es la persona que cuida en la familia. Entonces no se identifica el mismo.

(Peter) 
Bueno, permítanme decirles que sucede en los próximo años.  Carol tiene cinco catéteres por separado de diálisis peritoneal reemplazados debido a infecciones. Ella tuvo  peritonitis - infección de su abdomen.  Ella sufre dos ataques del corazon, está encamada. El último atento de diálisis peritoneal falló de nuevo. ¿Y ahora qué?  ¿Qué sucede aquí, médicamente?  ¿Qué tienen para ofrecer?

(Rebeca) 
Bueno, yo pienso que es aquí donde esperamos que los doctores y Jim y Carol hayan tenido conversaciones de cuán lejos Carol desea ir, y si su calidad de vida está hasta el punto donde ella quisiera continuar diálisis.

(Peter) 
Yo les puedo decir que Carol reconoce la gravedad de la situación  Y ella ve como el cuidado de ella tiene a Jim desmejorado, y ella le dice a su doctor que ella está considerando dos opciones... ella puede ir a un asilo, pero explíicitamente dice que ésto acabaría con el fondo de retiro y ahorros, y ella dice aquí,  'Yo sé que voy a morir antes de Jim, ésto lo dejaría en quiebra.'  Ella dice que ella tambien sabe que podría parar la diálisis, como tú indicas, e ir a un cuidado de fin de vida, como un hospicio.  Ella dice que por lo menos ésto dejaría a Jim con memorias, y pudiendo vivir sobre el nivel de pobreza.  ¿No cubriría su seguro el asilo?  ¿Porqué tiene que irse en quiebra ella misma? 

(risa)

(Lou) 
Bien, éso ...¡éso es una mini-series!

(Suzanne)  
¡Tú acertastes!  La gente piensa que Medicare cubre el cuidado de largo término.. .  Lo cuál, no es solamente asilos, pero los asilos son parte de una opción en el cuidado de largo término.. Pero de hecho, no lo es.

(Dr. Peter Salgo) 
¿Pero no es ésto una paradoja increíble?  Nuestra tecnología ...todo lo que hemos creado ha ayudado a que Carol prolongue su vida, y aún, aquí estamos al final del día, teniendo que hacer una decisión difícil, que no hubiésemos tenido que hacer sin esta tecnología..  ¿Cómo en esta vida, podemos hacer esa decision?

(Dr. Lou Papa) 
Porque  -- porque el sistema médico está desarrollado para una filosofía de un golpe, no de un quejido.

(Peter) 
T.S. Elliott ahora nos trae al mundo real. ...

(Lou) 
Correcto, correcto, así es que nuestro sistema médico está diseñado en un modelo de cuidado agudo.  

(Suzanne Mintz) 
Sí, sí ...

(Lou) 
... te rompes una pierna, te cortas, te da un resfriado, vas al doctor, recibes tratamiento, episódico.  No está hecho de un modelo de cuidado crónico. La mayoría de las personas no mueren en la cama, ¿lo saben?   Ellos fueron a la cama, y los nietos... Se enferman de forma crónica, y hay un prolongado -  la mayoría de los dólares del cuidado de salud son gastados en el último año de vida.   Así es que, el sistema médico en su totalidad  - y ésto es parte de mi frustración, si no lo notas – está construído en  ....

(Suzanne) 
¡El mío también!

(Lou) 
... correcto, está desarrollado en este modelo de cuidado agudo que es anticuado. Es el equivalente de, como saben...  ...

(Peter) 
Bueno, aquí estamos, quiero decir, que a pesar de todo...aquí estamos al final del día..  ... ¿Cómo podría alguien estudiar y tomar parte en esta decisión?  Yo creo que voy a dejarme morir, para que los recuerdos que mi esposo tenga de mi sean felices, y él tiene dinero para vivir.de largo.  ¿Cómo nuestra tecnología, al final del día, nos ha traído a esta pregunta, la cuál, en tiempos pasados, era ...

(Peter) 
... reservada para el Todopoderoso.  ¿Quién hace estas decisiones?  Quiero decir, tú como doctor, ¿intervienes en estas cosas,  o ésto no es una decisión médica?

(Dr. Rebeca Monk) 
Nosotros intervenimos, hablamos ...  referimos los pacientes de diálisis, nos reunimos con los pacientes regularmente, varias veces al año, para hablar de cuáles serían sus deseos, y esperamos que cuando ellos decidan renunciar a la diálisis, si es debido a ...una falta de calidad de vida, que esa sea la decisión de ellos para hacerlo.

(Lou) 
Las conversaciones que tienen que suceder y no son de 15 minutos .....no pueden ser llevadas a cabo por teléfono, realmente requieren múltiples miembros de la familia,   personas múltiples que ofrecen el cuidado, que no serían hasta miembros de la familia  - para hablar de ésto. Así es, sí, quiero decir, es...es parte del cuidado del paciente.

(Joe) 
Yo creo que el concepto aquí... como saben, hemos tratado bastante de mantener la vida, prolongar la vida... y no hemos pasado mucho tiempo pensando acerca de una muerte buena.  Pienso que todos vamos a morir.... éstos son asuntos que todos nos vamos a enfrentar, y éstos son asuntos que realmente han salido a la lucha.  Y también hay una rama completa de la medicina ahora – medicina de cuidado paliativo – que realmente, yo pienso, ha tomado un camino extenso en tocar, como saben, sólo los temas de hacer el paciente sentirse mejor, hacer sentir cómodo al paciente, y hacer que la familia se sienta cómoda con la transición.

(Peter) 
¿Howard, cómo está tu esposa ahora?

(Howard Moore) 
Ella está muy bien... de nuevo, yo me repito yo mismo cuán fuerte ella, ya saben, se ve.  ... esa es su fé – nuestra fé – que en algun momento ella no tendrá que seguir con ésto,  que hay un riñón allá para ella. Y, lo que ella cree y yo creo...sucederá.

(Peter) 
Pausemos por un minuto y repasemos; hemos cubierto mucho terreno. Al tratar con una enfermedad crónica en la etapa final, las decisiones a favor y en contra de la intervención pueden ser agonizantes para hacerlas y vivirlas. Es importante que la comunicación abierta resulte en que se consideren todas las opciones.   Carol y Jim consideraron sus opciones. Tan inválida como Carol está, ella y  Jim decidieron vender todas sus propiedades para pagar por el cuidado de ella en un asilo local donde ella recibe diálisis,  y ella entró a un asilo. Entonces, juntos, escribieron una directiva avanzada donde Carol estipuló que si ella perdiese la función cognitiva, si ella no pudiese relacionarse con Jim, ella quisiera que la sacaran de diálisis, y que no se le dé ningún cuidado extraordinario, si su corazon fallase, quiere decir, ella se ordenó ella misma 'el no ser resucitada' ... DNR.  Howard ... tú no estás ahí.   ¿Qué consejo puedes ofrecer como alguien que cuida a otra persona con enfermedad de los riñones?

(Howard) 
Yo creo que ésto es algo que debe ser puesto en la mesa por cualquiera, porque sabemos que es inevitable. .

(Dr. Lou Papa) 
Absolutamente.

(Dr. Peter Salgo) 
¿Qué piensas de la decisión de Carol? ¿Y específicamente el vender todas las propiedades, irse a un asilo?

(Gail Gibson Hunt) 
Yo empecé a pensar enseguida acerca de, no habrá algo más que ellos pudieran hacer, que no sea el vender todas las propiedades?  Porque me parece a mí, ¿qué sucederá con  Jim al final?  Quiero decir, ésto es muy común, que el que vive, el cónyugue sobreviviente se quede sin dinero. Digo, ¿qué va a hacer él? 

(Peter) 
Una última pregunta, muy breve -  ¿quién tiene el camino más difícil aquí, Carol o su esposo que la cuida?

(Suzanne) 
Ugh ...

(Lou)  
Sí ... sí ...

(Suzanne) 
Yo no ... Yo no creo que ustedes pueden contestar éso.  Y, francamente, ellos dependen de la familia individual ....pero ambos ...muy, muy difícil.
.
(Peter) Bien, con éso, hemos agotado el tiempo. Quiero darles las gracias a todos por estar aquí.   Howard – compartiendo esta clase de información no es fácil.  Muchas gracias por venir.  Estamos muy agradecidos. .

(Howard) 
Gracias por tenerme.

(Peter) 
Con éso, permítanme resumir varias cosas porque hemos cubierto mucho terreno hoy.    Algunas cosas claves para recordar.  En manejar una enfermedad crónica, el peso en el que cuida es grande, y hay costos físicos y emocionales al que cuida.  El paciente no es el único que necesita ser cuidado y observado.  Al tratarse de una enfermedad crónica en la etapa final, las decisiones a favor y en contra la intervención pueden ser agonizantes para hacer y para vivir. Es importante que la comunicación abierta resulte en que todas las opciones sean consideradas.  Y, desde luego, nuestro mensaje final is siempre éste: hacerse cargo de tu salud significa estar informado, tener comunicación de calidad con tu doctor.  Yo soy Dr. Peter Salgo, y les  veré la próxima vez en otro Second Opinion.


(Locutor) 
Busquen información de salud y aprendan más acerca de la comunicación de doctor/paciente en el sitio de la web de Second Opinion. La direccion es: pbs.org. 

(música)


(Announcer) 
Los fondos principales para Second Opinion son ofrecidos por la Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association, una asociación de planes de la Blue Cross/Blue Shield que son independientes, de propiedad local y basados en la comunidad, dedicados a un mejor conocimiento para tener vidas saludables.  

Fondos Adicionales ofrecidos por:

 (música)

Somos  PBS.