Skip to Navigation

Full Episodes
Share This:

The following Episodes are available in full on-demand. Watch them below or visit the individual episode pages.

(note: Episodes from Seasons 1-3 are not available online).

Episodesort icon Full Episode Episode number
Stroke Intervention

(Source: NIH / National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke) A stroke occurs when the blood supply to part of the brain is suddenly interrupted or when a blood vessel in the brain bursts, spilling blood into the spaces surrounding brain cells. Brain cells die when they no longer receive oxygen and nutrients from the blood or there is sudden bleeding into or around the brain. The symptoms of a stroke include sudden numbness or weakness, especially on one side of the body; sudden confusion or trouble speaking or understanding speech; sudden trouble seeing in one or both eyes; sudden trouble with walking, dizziness, or loss of balance or coordination; or sudden severe headache with no known cause. There are two forms of stroke: ischemic - blockage of a blood vessel supplying the brain, and hemorrhagic - bleeding into or around the brain.

Visit the full episode page

See video
601
Spinal Cord Injury

(Source: NIH / National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke) Your spinal cord is a bundle of nerves that runs down the middle of your back. It carries signals back and forth between your body and your brain. A spinal cord injury disrupts the signals. Spinal cord injuries usually begin with a blow that fractures or dislocates your vertebrae, the bone disks that make up your spine. Most injuries don't cut through your spinal cord. Instead, they cause damage when pieces of vertebrae tear into cord tissue or press down on the nerve parts that carry signals.

Visit the full episode page

See video
712
Sleep Apnea

(Source: NIH) Sleep apnea (AP-ne-ah) is a common disorder in which you have one or more pauses in breathing or shallow breaths while you sleep. Breathing pauses can last from a few seconds to minutes. They may occur 30 times or more an hour. Typically, normal breathing then starts again, sometimes with a loud snort or choking sound.

Visit the full episode page

See video
1103
Shingles

(Source: CDC) Shingles is caused by the varicella zoster virus, the same virus that causes chickenpox. After a person recovers from chickenpox, the virus stays in the body in a dormant (inactive) state. For reasons that are not fully known, the virus can reactivate years later, causing shingles.  Almost 1 out of every 3 people in the United States will develop shingles, also known as zoster or herpes zoster. There are an estimated 1 million cases each year in this country. Anyone who has recovered from chickenpox may develop shingles; even children can get shingles. However the risk of disease increases as a person gets older. About half of all cases occur among men and women 60 years old or older.

Visit the full episode page

See video
908
Reversing Heart Disease

Coronary artery disease occurs when a substance called plaque builds up in the arteries that supply blood to the heart. You can help prevent heart disease by making healthy choices and managing any medical conditions you may have. 

Visit the full episode page

See video
1010