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The following Episodes have special short companion "Webisodes" available. Watch them below or visit the individual episode pages.

Episode Webisode Episode numbersort icon
Dizziness

(Source: NIH / MedlinePlus) Dizziness is a term that is often used to describe two different symptoms: lightheadedness and vertigo. Light-headedness is a feeling like you might faint. Vertigo is a feeling that you are spinning or moving, or that the the world is spinning around you. Most causes of dizziness are not serious and either quickly get better on their own or are easily treated.

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Spinal Cord Injury

(Source: NIH / National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke) Your spinal cord is a bundle of nerves that runs down the middle of your back. It carries signals back and forth between your body and your brain. A spinal cord injury disrupts the signals. Spinal cord injuries usually begin with a blow that fractures or dislocates your vertebrae, the bone disks that make up your spine. Most injuries don't cut through your spinal cord. Instead, they cause damage when pieces of vertebrae tear into cord tissue or press down on the nerve parts that carry signals.

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HPV Vaccine/Cervical Cancer

(Source: National Cancer Institute / NIH) Cervical cancer is caused by several types of a virus called human papillomaviruses (HPV). The virus spreads through sexual contact. Most women's bodies are able to fight HPV infection. But sometimes the virus leads to cancer. You are at higher risk if you smoke, have many children, use birth control pills for a long time, or have HIV infection.

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Heart Replacement

(Source: NIH / MedlinePlus) Heart failure is a condition in which the heart can't pump enough blood throughout the body. Heart failure does not mean that your heart has stopped or is about to stop working. It means that your heart is not able to pump blood the way it should.

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Fecal Incontinence

(Source: NDDIC / NIH) More than 5.5 million Americans experience loss of bowel control (fecal incontinence). It affects people of all ages, and can be devastating to a person’s self esteem and family life. Knowing what treatments are available can improve bowel control and makes incontinence easier to manage.

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