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E-Cigarettes Safe?

(Source: NIH / National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute) COPD, or chronic obstructive pulmonary (PULL-mun-ary) disease, is a progressive disease that makes it hard to breathe. "Progressive" means the disease gets worse over time. COPD can cause coughing that produces large amounts of mucus (a slimy substance), wheezing, shortness of breath, chest tightness, and other symptoms. Cigarette smoking is the leading cause of COPD. Most people who have COPD smoke or used to smoke. Long-term exposure to other lung irritants—such as air pollution, chemical fumes, or dust—also may contribute to COPD.

Nearly five million people in the United States are living with some degree of dementia. Over the next few decades, aging baby boomers are expected to push that number even higher. This episode of Second Opinion introduces a panel of researchers and healthcare providers, along with one extraordinary dementia patient, who explore the latest trends in diagnosing and treating one of the most frightening illnesses a family can face.

Today, one in five Americans will experience a diagnosable mental health disorder. That adds up to 44 million adults and 4 million children. And yet, it remains under-recognized by primary care doctors. This episode of Second Opinion introduces a panel of medical experts and health care providers, along with the First Lady of New Jersey, Mary Jo Codey, who shares her personal battle with depression. Together they explore the latest trends in diagnosis and treatment of this debilitating disease. 

Almost 30 million people in the U.S. have Type II Diabetes. It’s a disease that can be greatly improved by lifestyle changes including a healthy diet and exercise, along with medication compliance and monitoring. But not many people do as well as Mark Lee, who completely turned his life around after his diagnosis. His story is an inspiration to those who struggle every day with controlling their diabetes.

Life expectancy for people with Down Syndrome has increased over the last 30 years – from 25 years old in 1983 to 60 years old today.  While Down Syndrome carries certain health issues and risks, people with Down Syndrome and their families are moving beyond the limitations of this disability. Patient and Special Olympic medalist Frankie Antonelli and his mother Debbie share what their family has done to help Frankie reach his full potential.